Little thrills, little trips, little ideas

My Humble Wagashi Creations

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Ever since my first wagashi (Namagashi, to be specific) class in Kanazawa in April, I have been spellbound by the beautiful creations made by wagashi masters, the meaning behind different wagashi for each season and their purpose in festivals and tea ceremonies. Many designs created are usually inspired by Haiku poems.

I finally took up the courage to make wagashi again after my second class in Singapore with ABC cooking studio. However, both classes, the wagashi pastes were pre-prepared. I had to do some research on my own to create the paste from scratch without the original white bean (or navy bean) which is found only in Japan. I used lima beans as a substitute. Its a long process but through this, I learnt to appreciate the art of making wagashi even more. So here are some of my humble creations for summer.

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Summer Peach

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Chrysanthemum in full bloom

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Love Birds

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Summer wagashi

 

Author: ongling

Hi, I have been making bento lunch boxes for my toddler son for a year. Its a challenge everyday to think of new bento ideas to excite him. The creations are endless and took a lot of trial and errors. But most importantly, his bento lunches must deliver 3 key goals: exciting presentation (eye appeal), exciting tastes (texture & ingredients) and exciting adventures (dare to try; food play). Recently, I started making my husband lunch bentos too for work after he got envious of seeing beautiful bentos prepared by Japanese wives on Japanese TV network. I am learning and picking up skills from many talented bento makers everyday to improve myself. Here are some of my creations I would like to share with you. Apart from bentos, there some travel stories and little things i enjoy doing related to food and culture in this blog. So enjoy and share your thoughts with me.

8 thoughts on “My Humble Wagashi Creations

  1. They look amazing! Think I like the crysanthium the most.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks! The chrysanthemum was my fave too, most difficult to do…

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have never tasted Wagashi. Are they nice?

        Liked by 1 person

      • There are many different types of Wagashi for different seasons. They are very sweet but very nice with green tea. This one I made is not as chewy as Mochi rice cake as 90% is white bean paste and the rest is gyuuhi, sweet rice flour paste. I am in love with Wagashi art, google this master’s work on his Facebook, you will be amazed, Junichi Mitsubori.

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      • Hmm. Am not a big fan of Mochi as I find it a bit ‘glue/chewy’ so can only eat a small piece. Googled Junichi Mitsubori and his work looks amazing.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hope you can get a chance to try it. Its texture is different from Mochi. The closest example is like biting into smooth red bean paste balls. The little bit of Mochi like ingredient (gyuuhi) is to hold the white bean paste together like starch. Of course, this is only 1 type of Wagashi. 😊

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  2. Hi, I would like to learn how to make wagashi, is ABC the only place in Singapore teaching this?

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    • I am so sorry to reply to you this late. I hope it is still helpful to answer your question. So far, ABC is the only place I know that teaches basic wagashi making. However, from there, you can pick up skills from Internet and practice on your own. I took some basic lessons in Japan like Kanazawa to improve the art of making wagashi. Give ABC a try.

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